Tuesday, 28 August 2012

Book Review: 'English Grammar in Use Online' by Raymond Murphy






English Grammar in Use (Online)
A self-study reference and practice book for intermediate learners of English
Raymond Murphy
Cambridge University Press 2012
ISBN 9780521189392

Publisher's Website
-------------------------------------------------------------
From the blurb: This new edition with answers:
  • has a fresh, appealing new design and clear layout, with revised and updated examples
  • is arranged in a tried-and-trusted, easy to use format, with explanations of grammar points on each left-hand page and exercises to check understanding on the right
  • is perfect for independent studying and the study guide helps learners to identify which language points to focus on
  • contains lots of additional practice exercises to consolidate learning
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"English Grammar in Use Online"
~ COMPETITION ~

FIVE 12 MONTH SUBSCRIPTIONS TO WIN!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TO ENTER: Easy! Write to competition@hotchpotchenglish.com and say 'ONLINE'!
CLOSING DATE: Sunday, 16th September at MIDNIGHT! ~


Raymond Murphy’s English Grammar in Use hardly needs any introduction. It’s the ‘world’s best-selling grammar book’ according to the cover and who am I to disagree.

The red (Essential Grammar in Use) and blue (this one) ‘Murphys’ have been standard issue in every staff room or teachers' resource cupboard I’ve ever come across and I can’t see that changing any time soon.

The reason for their success is their simplicity. Each double page spread is a unit covering one grammar point or aspect of English. The explanations and examples are on the left and the straightforward exercises are on the right. All well and good and a stunning success, often copied but rarely bettered throughout the English language teaching publishing world.

But that’s not the reason I’m holding a brand new copy of the fourth edition (with answers and CD-ROM) in my sweaty hands today.

No, the reason we’re taking another look at English Grammar in Use doesn’t even need the book, because the entire thing is now on-line in a super-duper interactive version and rather splendid it is too.

To cut a short story even shorter, the whole darn book is there: every unit, every exercise, every supplementary activity and piece of reference material.

Not only that but some lucky people had the task of recording the whole thing orally so you can click next to virtually every sentence and hear it beautifully read in the best RP or something resembling it. I couldn’t have done a better job myself, and doubt that I’d have lasted the course given my attention span.

The interface is crisp and clear – even more so than the book actually. The main reason for this is increased space on the page - the sentences aren't so squished together and this increases readability immensely.

An additional aid to clarity is the ability to hide the details of the examples you are not working on from any page. And finally, the exercises are 'called up' from below the relevant explanation and open in new windows which obviously makes total sense as learners will want to refer back to the explanations as they work.

Other interesting features include the ability to bookmark your favourite (?) grammar exercises to get back to them easily, a search box and a little notepad for your own ideas attached to each page.

There are now a ridiculous number of follow-up exercises, both under the Additional Exercises tab, and in the English Grammar in Use 'Extra' section, which is also supplied as a CD at the back of the paper version with its 300+ extra exercises.

This latter element didn't actually work when I tried it but I'll no doubt get a panicky message as soon as this review goes live assuring me in the nicest possible terms that it does and that the fault is all mine or my computer's, which I'll be perfectly happy to accept. After all, a product this slick wouldn't be let loose with such an important element missing or malfunctioning, for sure.

I was a little sad to see that the handy and colourful little pull-out Grammar Reference booklet at the back of the book has been replaced by an altogether sterner Grammar Words detachable section, also part of the on-line package (but not so easily detachable). The Appendices still cover the basics if learners need them however.

My only slight niggle in all of this excellent adaptation is that the loading of exercises and certain interfaces is sometimes less than instantaneous. That isn't a euphemism for 'bloody slow' but you certainly have a few seconds to wait for most of them. In these times of instant gratification even a couple of seconds can seem like an eternity these days! Cambridge tell me they are aware of this and are working on it so it should speed up soon and isn't a major problem anyway.

I shouldn't forget the Study Guide either, which I've often used as a bit of a diagnostic test with students in the past. This points students in the direction of the units they need, and I should also say that all the units are linked to related pages making it as easy as possible for the user to navigate around the monster.

So a real success I would say, and if something like this existed for French or Spanish I'd certainly get myself a copy forthwith for my own purposes. This product almost makes redundant a thousand on-line ELT resources sites specialising in English language grammar exercises and explanations I'm afraid (for them) and for the self-motivated learner into studying alone and into the Murphy format, the online version of English Grammar In Use is the obvious path forward.

Finally, those nice people at Cambridge are offering five (5 - FIVE!!!!!) year-long subscriptions to English Grammar In Use Online for five lucky winners. See the box below for details, and thanks Cambridge for that.

"English Grammar in Use Online"
~ COMPETITION ~

FIVE 12 MONTH SUBSCRIPTIONS TO WIN!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TO ENTER: Easy! Write to competition@hotchpotchenglish.com and say 'ONLINE'!
~ CLOSING DATE: Sunday, 16th September at MIDNIGHT! ~


------------------------------------------------------------

Sab Will is, or has been, a freelance teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies, ELT writer, fanatical blogger, Facebook freak and website weirdo. He is also a well-known street photographer, abstract artist, poet and Paris city chronicler. The 'well-known' bit only applies to those who know him well, however.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Hotch Potch English: 'The ELT Resources Review Blog' ~ Book Review: "IELTS Express"
© 2012 Sab Will / Hotch Potch English
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Tuesday, 14 August 2012

Book Review: 'Business Advantage' by Handford, Koester, Lisboa, Pitt






Business Advantage
Intermediate & Upper Intermediate Coursebooks
Michael Handford, Almut Koester, Martin Lisboa, Angela Pitt
Cambridge University Press 2011 / 2012
ISBN 9780521132206 / 9780521132176

Publisher's Website
-------------------------------------------------------------
From the blurb: "Business Advantage is based on a unique syllabus that combines current business theory, business in practice and business skills - all presented using authentic, expert input. The course contains specific business-related outcomes making the material highly relevant and engaging." 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Every time one of the big publishers releases a major new course I'm always intrigued to see what they've come up with this time.

Here we have a definite biggie - Cambridge University Press - bringing out a brand new business English course called Business Advantage at the intermediate (B1) and upper-intermediate (B2) levels to start with. An advanced level C1-C2 volume is on its way. You can tell it's for business from the number of times they mention the word in just one part of their back cover blurb, quoted above, can't you?!

It's almost always the huge publishers who bring these things out these days, given the vast amount of resources required to create a new English course worthy of the name. Oxford University Press, Macmillan Education, Pearson Longman, Heinle... the usual suspects. But what makes a new coursebook series successful? It seems to me there are two main reasons.

The first is that it's new. As simple as that. Teachers, and students too for that matter, get bored with the same approach and layout, and presentations can feel stale after using them for a few times and the desire for something fresh sets in. Publishers love having new coursebooks to push and reactions to them are usually interested at least if not downright positive.

The second reason for a new English course's success is more of a conditional one. A new coursebook is an opportunity to try out new approaches, page layouts and course structures, as well as introduce innovative elements such as student's DVDs or interactive on-line content.

So how does Cambridge's new offering, Business Advantage measure up? Taking into account both of the above points, including a genuinely fresh angle, attractive layout as usual (if fairly dense), and a clearly delineated unit structure, Business Advantage goes straight onto the short list of books any Director of Studies should be considering today to refresh their teaching syllabus.

Let's take a closer look. Each course book is divided into 14 units which are further subdivided into seven categories common to both levels: Business Environment; Managing People; Managing Cultures; Managing Operations; Marketing; Accounting and Finance; Strategies and Decision-making.

The units from each category follow a logical progression and development across the two levels. The intermediate book has units on Motivation and Human Resources in the Managing People section, and the upper-intermediate level units deals with Rewarding Performance and Fostering Creativity. The Marketing section covers Marketing Strategy and Customer Relationship Management at intermediate and E-marketing and Branding at upper. A nice coherent approach so far. But what about the units themselves?

Each unit, as hinted at in the blurb above, is divided into three sections: Theory, Practice (based around a real-world case study), and Skills. For each of these there are clearly identified areas of focus, key language, reading and listening input and speaking and writing output.

An example from the skills part of The Learning Organisation unit from the intermediate book would be: Focus - taking an active part in negotiations; Language - giving an opinion, agreeing and disagreeing; Input - an external meeting between a vehicle manufacturer and their supplier; Output - negotiate a deal.

So much for the structure, which is clear and satisfying. What about the approach. For me this is one of the things which makes Business Advantage a definite contender for a language school's new business English course main support.

What Cambridge have done, in fact, is decide to market this as teaching business through English, as opposed to the more common English-through-business approach, and this is the first time I've seen it attempted, and achieved, so explicitly.

The difference is perhaps subtle, but vital, especially for the image of the course in today's increasingly sophisticated business world. Few managers and other professionals these days can deal with the idea of 'going back to school' like little kids, kicking their short-clad legs under the desk as some teacher tries to teach them the present perfect, unsuccessfully, for the umpteenth time.

Business professionals need to feel they are coming at English from their camp, from the world of high-powered deals and tricky problem solving, building on what they know - their business skills - and incorporating just one more business skill - English - into their armoury. Or, failing that, if they are new to the professional world, it is much more satisfying to be learning business skills as English slips in through the back door as it were.

That seems to be the approach Cambridge have chosen here. The Theory sections are about business theory, not linguistics; supply chain management, not subordinate clauses. The Practice sections come to the language through and after the case studies with Dell, Unilever, IKEA, Cisco Systems... have been thoroughly introduced, not before them. And the Skills sections are once again back to business competences: taking part in meetings and negotiations, proposing solutions, presenting facts and figures, international team building, over and before (but including) the language needed to perform these functions effectively.

Personally, I'm keen to try these courses out on real-world victims and see how they cope; I think the results will be encouraging if I know some of my clients well.

But is this all enough to really make Business Advantage stand out from the crowd, which includes some other very worthy competitors from the other 'biggies' already mentioned. Let's quickly look at what else the course has to offer.

For a start, I haven't mentioned that each of the seven sections at each level has a special two-page writing unit to deal with key business skills such as writing proposals, responding to complaints, describing graphs and formal versus informal e-mails.

Then there are the student's DVDs. Each student's book includes this series of seven case studies on the seven section topics, but not the same ones as the case studies in the book units themselves. The areas covered are very varied, including business angels, wind farms, electronics, banking and brand names and plenty more. I didn't notice much difference in the comprehension difficulty between the two levels' DVDs, but then all the interviewees were speaking naturally and fairly clearly, so I suppose they decided not to grade them particularly for this purpose.

A short commentary from a business school student adds to the variety of English and ideas on offer for each DVD case study. These are intended for student self-study along with special worksheets on the website but could just as easily be exploited in class if necessary. I found the video scripts on the website too, along with some additional activities and bilingual word lists from the course currently available in French, German, Italian, Polish and Russian.

At the back of the student's book they get all the audio scripts from the units as well as the answers in a clear nod to the self-study market. They don't get the listenings themselves, however, and would have to buy these separately if they wanted the full home-study package. I had access to the upper-intermediate class audio CDs, by the way, and found their level to be quite appropriate and the spoken English highly, if not 'perfectly' natural but fine for the purpose with a good variety of accents into the bargain.

Finally, we come to the part I've been most looking forward to (of course I look forward to reviewing course books, are you crazy..?) - the Classware component.

This, and I quote, 'allows you to access and manipulate all the core content from the Student's Book, including video, audio, images and text, from a single electronic platform'.

In other words, it's good to go with interactive whiteboards or just computers and a projector and you can make notes, zoom, hide stuff, save things and even combine your own materials with the published content.

Sounds good. And it is, great fun. I thoroughly enjoyed playing around with the Classware component and envisage using it with both classes and one-to-one students as an exciting new element for them to experience. It did take a bit of messing around with the two CDs they supplied but after it was up and running it was pretty intuitive (I didn't read or need any instructions, which is lucky, because there weren't any...).

The bits I enjoyed most were starting the listenings instantly and toggling the audio scripts on and off, and, in particular, adding my own pictures, page jumps, web links and useful notes to the pages to be brought up with a click - brilliant!

You can save them all as 'sessions' and open them up as and when necessary. You could have different sessions for different classes using the same book, with their own personalised notes added as you go through the lessons. I could go on, but the advantages of this techology are multiple and the possibilities endless.

To sum up, then, I find Business Advantage an excellent new course, thoroughly up-to-date, with an inventively authentic business-focused approach. Cambridge describe it as 'the course for university and in-company learners, equipping them with the language they need to succeed in a business environment', and I'd say that's currently just about right. Well worth checking out.

------------------------------------------------------------

Sab Will is, or has been, a freelance teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies, ELT writer, fanatical blogger, Facebook freak and website weirdo. He is also a well-known street photographer, abstract artist, poet and Paris city chronicler. The 'well-known' bit only applies to those who know him well, however.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Hotch Potch English: 'The ELT Resources Review Blog' ~ Book Review: "Business Advantage"
© 2012 Sab Will / Hotch Potch English
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Monday, 13 August 2012

Book Review: '500 Activities for the Primary Classroom' by Carol Read






500 Activities for the Primary Classroom
Immediate Ideas and Solutions
Carol Read
MacMillan Education 2007
ISBN 9781405099073

Publisher's Website
-------------------------------------------------------------
From the blurb: 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom is an indispensable collection of practical activities for teaching English to primary-aged children. It aimes to develop an awareness of the complex factors involved in working effectively with classes of children and to lay a solid foundation in primary language teaching skills.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


"700 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES"

  
~ COMPETITION ~

5 COPIES TO WIN!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TO ENTER: Easy! Write to competition@hotchpotchenglish.com and say '700'!
~ CLOSING DATE: 21st August, 2012 ~


Unlike its earlier stablemate, 700 Classroom Activities, Carol Read's book positions itself as much more of a 'handbook', 'the definitive handbook for all primary teachers and teacher trainers', no less, whilst still offering its eponymous 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom.

The tone is set by the rather meaty 12-page introduction which is excellent reading for new and needing-reinspired teachers alike.

After an introduction to the book itself and how to use it there's a 'Working with children section' which explores ideas on 'creating optimal conditions for children's learning'. The (literally) Child-centred C-Wheel model is introduced, followed by descriptions of each of the eight cutely coordinated C-chosen categories: Context; Connections; Coherence; Challenge; Curiosity; Care; Community and Creativity.

Having done a Primary Teacher Training Certificate with Carol at the British Council in Paris a few years ago I can assure you, without going into too many details, that this is the real deal and a great introduction to the topic.

This is followed by sections on 'Managing children positively', 'Relationships', 'Rules', 'Routines', 'Rights and responsibilities', 'Respect' and 'Rewards'. After the C-Circle I'd have thought there was definitely scope for an R-Rectangle there Carol!

The judiciously weighty intro finishes with general guidelines for setting up activities and then we're ready to rock and roll into the... introduction to the Listening and Speaking Activities section.

In effect, each of the activities sections has a three-page introduction giving specific information and hints and tips on the types of actvities therein. As well as a Listening and Speaking section there is Reading and Writing, Vocabulary and Grammar, Storytelling and Drama, Games, Rhymes, Chants and Songs (my favourite), Art and Craft, Content Based Learning, the appropriately up to date ICT and Multimedia, and that old chestnut, Learning To Learn.

As with the companion title for older learners, 700 Classroom Activities, there's far too much here to get into describing individual exercises. Therefore I'll do what I've done before and open at random and cite a few activity titles:

From the Games section: Jumping Beans; Hopscotch; Abracadabra; Pass The Secret; Feely Bag Games; Name Games; Can I Cross Your River, Mr Crocodile?

From the Rhymes, Chants and Songs section: Clapping Chants; Instructions Rhyme; The Name Rap; Animal Noises; Spot The Rhyming Words; Counting Songs; A Rhyme A Month.

From the Content Based Learning section: Mixing Colours; Metal, Plastic, Glass or Wood?; Characteristics In Common; Bug World; Life Cycles; Growing A Plant; The Water Cycle.

From the ICT and Multimedia section: Email A Friend About A Book; Weather Check; Class Email Group; Subtitle Options; Repeat What They Say; A Visitor In Town.

From the Vocabulary and Grammar section: Secret Letter; Word Tennis; Sentence Chains; Physical Line-up; Monster Adjectives; It Looks Like...; Beep!; Mime The Grammar.

Apart from the delightfully kids-oriented approach to each subject, the activities include extremely clear instructions and necessary information, including Level, Age, Organisation, Aims, Language Focus, Materials, Procedure and very useful Comments and Suggestions allowing you to adapt or prolong activities or their themes based on your own teaching situation.

The aforementioned Learning To Learn section is also one of my favourites, as it allows children to become aware of and to an extent take charge of their own learning aims and progress towards them. Teachers, in particular, will find this section invaluable, especially in the eyes of the parents I would imagine, as it allows you to show explicitly what children are learning and the successes they are achieving in their own words and creations.

Activities include Setting Goals, Grammar Mind Maps, Vocabulary Networks and Clines, Class Contracts and Classroom Jobs, Things That Help Me Learn, How I Like To Do Homework (!!!!!), Self Assessments, Learning Diaries and so it goes on.

It's doubtful that all of these could be done with a single class but I'm sure that's not the intention. Teachers would probably pick three or four of these techniques and try them out with their class to see how it goes, but the resources are valuable and worthy ones.

To sum up, 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom is a superb resource for any teacher looking to spice up their lessons, discover hundreds of new things to do with their classes and re-energise themselves in the most fun and satisfying way possible.


 P.S. For the next week we are giving away 5 copies of companion volume 700 Classroom Activities - see below for details!

"700 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES"

~ COMPETITION ~

5 COPIES TO WIN!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TO ENTER: Easy! Write to competition@hotchpotchenglish.com and say '700'!
~ CLOSING DATE: 21st August, 2012 ~


------------------------------------------------------------

Sab Will is, or has been, a freelance teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies, ELT writer, fanatical blogger, Facebook freak and website weirdo. He is also a well-known street photographer, abstract artist, poet and Paris city chronicler. The 'well-known' bit only applies to those who know him well, however.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Hotch Potch English: 'The ELT Resources Review' ~ Book Review: "500 Activities for the Primary Classroom"
© 2012 Sab Will / Hotch Potch English
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Thursday, 9 August 2012

Book Review: 'Campaign - English for the Military' by Mellor-Clark & Baker de Altamirano






Campaign
English for the military
Simon Mellor-Clark
Yvonne Baker de Altamirano
Macmillan Education 2004
ISBN 9781405009805

Publisher's Website
-------------------------------------------------------------
From the blurb: Campaign is designed to meet the English language needs of military personnel engaged in all operations, including peacekeeping, humanitarian assistance and training exercises.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know it might look like I'm living behind the times, reviewing a book first published in 2004, but it's new to me, ok, and I'm always on the lookout for interesting materials to review I haven't come across before.

Which is why I was intrigued by the somewhat ahead of its time Campaign: English for the military, Student's Book 1.

It's actually a fascinating book, which cleverly weaves the English language and the needs of the military together with aplomb. Admittedly, the 'From the blurb' section doesn't mention one of the key eventualities of military personnel in the form of soldiers - combat - but practically everything around the topic is covered in appreciable detail for this level, elementary, and much more besides.

Each of the 14 units is cunningly divided into Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot and Golf sections.

Alpha introduces the topic and the key vocab in typical English language course book style.

Bravo and Charlie cover basic grammatical and lexical areas.

Delta deals with everyday English including non-military situations like shopping and socialising.

Echo and Foxtrot move into more functional language as well as more advanced vocabulary groups and pronunciation.

Golf, finally, revises the language learnt and provides consolidation of structures 'n' stuff.

As for the topics themselves, I'm no expert, so I couldn't claim for an instant to know whether they are the most relevant, but they've been 'vetted by officers from the American, British, French and Spanish armies', according to the publishers, and provide an accurate reflection of military life and language, so who am I to argue?

Indeed, they sound fascinating, and would be a welcome change from teaching bankers or lawyers (sorry guys). Random headings include Military Inventions, The Assault Course, Casualty Evactuation, Rules of Engagement, Working With People From Other Countries, Crash Landing, Terrain Analysis, The History of NATO, Aircraft, Vehicles and Naval Ships, and the eyebrow-raising Camp Orders.

I was disappointed not to see what I would consider vital expressions in this last section, such as 'Ooh, straighten your helmet, lovey, it's all wonky..' (cue canned laughter), but seriously, the book's got all angles covered as far as I can see, for an introductory, low-level text.

I just have one nagging question, despite wishing I'd had this book when teaching officers and soldiers from the French army at Versailles a few years ago: how many army personnel actually have the time to do '120 hours of classwork in the Student's Book backed up with 80 hours of revision in the Workbook?

Well, maybe they do for all I know, which is little, and in any case this is an excellent resourse to consider for any teacher working with the military needing inspiration and extra materials over and above what they may have been provided with or are able to produce themselves.

As ever I welcome any and all elucidating comments below to fill in the glaring gaps in my knowledge of military English, whether you've used the book or wrote it. At ease.

P.S. Watch out for a review of the sort of sister volume English for Law Enforcement, also from Macmillan Education, coming on these pages shortly.

------------------------------------------------------------

Sab Will is, or has been, a freelance teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies, ELT writer, fanatical blogger, Facebook freak and website weirdo. He is also a well-known street photographer, abstract artist, poet and Paris city chronicler. The 'well-known' bit only applies to those who know him well, however.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Hotch Potch English: 'The ELT Resources Review Blog' ~ Book Review: "IELTS Express"
© 2012 Sab Will / Hotch Potch English
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Book Review: '700 Classroom Activities' by Seymour & Popova






700 Classroom Activities
Instant Lessons for Busy Teachers
David Seymour & Maria Popova
MacMillan Education 2005
ISBN 9781405080019

Publisher's Website
-------------------------------------------------------------
From the blurb: 700 Classroom Activities provides an instantly accessibly repertoire of practical teaching ideas. It contains a range of activities, including both familiar favourites and new ideas at a range of levels from elementary to upper intermediate. The clear structure makes it easy to find activities to supplement coursebooks, and comprehensive instructions make them easy to use. All of the activities are ready to teach, with no photocopying required.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


"700 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES"

  
~ COMPETITION ~

5 COPIES TO WIN!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TO ENTER: Easy! Write to competition@hotchpotchenglish.com and say '700'!
~ EXTENDED until Friday: 24th August, 2012!!! ~


Short, juicy, delightful, delectable. It's hard to believe that within this relatively slim volume there is as much collected wisdom as any teacher might wish to have in a lifetime of teaching, never mind a month of Sundays.

All the classics are there, along with a plethora of marvellous new ideas, all immediately actionable, all photocopiless (new word, sez my spellcheck), all valuable and fun. And if that's not what any new or experienced teacher needs, I don't know what is.

It's extremely difficult to review a book of teaching ideas without either listing examples, which would be self-defeating (especially considering there are 700 of them), or just saying that it's good, or not, which would be banal.

To try and get around this problem and create an article worth reading nevertheless, I'll open the book at random and tell you what I find. Appropriately enough, it's called...

Bare Necessities
In pairs, brainstorm a list of the twenty most important things that you need on a day-to-day basis and put them in order from most to least important. See how your list and order compares with another pair.

What is the bare minimum that a person needs to survive? List a few other things that people say they need, but that might not in fact be necessary.

I can already imagine hilarious discussions as to whether tooth brushes and underpants are part of the bare minimum...

As it happens this is a good example of the feel of the book, if the majority of the activities are a bit longer and with more exercises incorporated.

It also illustrates the approach of getting the students talking and extending the activity when language ability permits.

700 Classroom Activities does have a certain structure to it; it's divided into four sections: Conversation; Functions; Grammar; Vocabulary. These sections are further divided, so under functions you'll find groups of activities relating to Ability, Advice, Buying and Selling, Complaining and Criticising, Deduction, Describing and so on.

The grammar section offers an excellent range of activites for all the main structures such as the first, second and third conditionals and even stuff like reported speech and relative clauses.

The vocabulary section gets into things like Parts of the Body, Phrasal Verbs, Exclamations, Holidays, Numbers and a bunch of other stuff. You get the idea.


The real magic of 700 Classroom Activities is that you can virtually pick it up and go, if you're looking for a specific communicative activity, or simply open it at random and have an off the hoof activity which will have your students thinking you're a cool, organised and prepared teacher, which of course you are, you are...

Personally, if I were starting over, and I was in a book shop and spotted this title I'd snap it up in a jiffy. And take it from there. Dare I say that's maybe all I'd ever need? No, probably not!

"700 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES"

~ COMPETITION ~

5 COPIES TO WIN!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TO ENTER: Easy! Write to competition@hotchpotchenglish.com and say '700'!
~ EXTENDED until Friday: 24th August, 2012!!! ~


------------------------------------------------------------

Sab Will is, or has been, a freelance teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies, ELT writer, fanatical blogger, Facebook freak and website weirdo. He is also a well-known street photographer, abstract artist, poet and Paris city chronicler. The 'well-known' bit only applies to those who know him well, however.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Hotch Potch English: 'The ELT Resources Review Blog' ~ Book Review: "IELTS Express"
© 2012 Sab Will / Hotch Potch English
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Related Posts with Thumbnails